Why Agencies Are Scared to Post Their Prices

This is my price sheet. I’m not afraid to post it because at the end of the day, my main goal is to help my clients achieve their goals.

I’ve worked for many agencies but because they have high overhead, they try to negotiate high prices. There’s nothing wrong with that, and I wish them all well because they keep people employed.

But that’s not what I personally believe in.

I believe in reasonable prices that allow me to devote attention to achieving my clients’ goals, and a commitment to agency-level work.

So, this is my price sheet. No hidden fees. If you’re ready to jumpstart your marketing strategy, let’s go!

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Branding Your Social Media Channels

branding instagram social media
Photo by Ben Kolde on Unsplash

I’ve been fascinated by watching Gen Z grow up and learn to use the internet in a much different way than I did. As a millennial, in my teen years, I spent countless hours chatting on AIM, and watching Napster take days to download a Smash Mouth song over our dial-up internet. I remember my first Hotmail email address (which my dad set up for me) and Facebook when it required a .edu email to register.

What I’m getting at is that the internet changed a lot, and it changed quickly, forcing Gen Z’ers to understand at an early age what the rest of us barely thought about: personal branding via social media.

My teen AIM username died with the platform last year, but let’s be honest, no one is going to think “Natalie Saar” when they read “Missyk134.” But there wasn’t the same pressure back then to brand yourself, or even just to make sure you got your name as your username before anyone else did.

Not only does this cause personal and business users to think outside the box when it comes to their name, it also requires them to think about the content they’re putting out. Each social media platform has a different offering, which is why they can all (somewhat) coexist with each other.

Twitter offers quick takes and the ability to interact with people, many of whom are strangers, in real time. It’s demographics skew younger.

Facebook offers news and sharing largely between friends and family. Its demographics skew older.

Instagram offers the chance to express yourself through photos and captions, and in a way combines the best of Facebook and Twitter.

LinkedIn offers a professional environment to connect in. You typically won’t find people arguing about politics there, because it’s very clearly a networking tool, and you’ll find that users hold each other to that.

Snapchat and Tumblr each have their own styles of helping people engage with each other as well, though they’re harder for markters to hack for various reasons.

So, how do you decide the way you want to brand all of these free advertising tools you have at your fingertips? Here are some tips to get you started:

Keep Some Aspects the Same

While each social media channel can have its on “personality” there are a few things you should keep the same. Your profile photo, cover photo, and overall vibe. Especially if you’re planning on very different messaging on your channels, you’ll want to keep the logo or profile picture and the overall look and feel as well. This way you build subtle brand awareness and people know that your channels lead back to you.

Buffer does an amazing job with this. Their Instagram and Twitter couldn’t look more different in terms of imagery and messaging, but they feel the same, so you know they’re both Buffer.

You’ll also want to try your best to make sure the name is the same. This may go without saying, but that can be a tall order, and will only get harder as more and more people become social online. Get creative and try a few variations, but when possible, keep the names the same.

Continue reading “Branding Your Social Media Channels”

Are Logos That Important?

Logos. We see them all day, every day. In fact, we see them so often that despite seeing them constantly, we forget what they look like.

Think about your shampoo: what does the logo look like. Or how about something simple like your favorite fast food place. AdWeek brought this up recently by asking people to draw some familiar logos like Domino’s Pizza and Apple. Here were the results:

So, that begs the question, are logos really that important? Of course we notice them, because we’re visual people, but maybe it’s the overall “vibe” of the logo that’s more meaningful. Some ideas to back that up: Continue reading “Are Logos That Important?”